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Is your 30% ruling ending?

24 September 2020

30% ruling end

Is your 30% ruling ending? Do you have worldwide assets? Contact us now to see what your tax saving possibilities are.

30% ruling end

Prior to 2019, the 30% ruling period was 8 years. As of January 2019 the period was shortened to 5 years. A two-year transition period was implemented lasting until January 1st 2021. This means that:

  • For anyone granted the ruling between January 1st 2011 and January 1st 2013 the 8-years still count, ending between January 1st 2019 and January 1st 2021;
  • those granted the ruling between January 1st 2013 and January 1st 2016 will be able to receive the allowance until 31 December 2020, giving them up to an additional two years following the extension;
  • anyone granted the ruling after January 1st 2016 will be eligible for the 30% ruling benefit for 5 years

30 % ruling is ending as of January 2021

This means that for many international workers their 30 % ruling is ending as of January 2021. If you are one of them, it is important to be well prepared for the consequences. Not only will your take-home salary become lower, but you will also need to start thinking about your wealth and what this will mean for your tax return.

Without the 30% ruling, you can no longer opt to be considered a partial non-domestic taxpayer. In other words, you will be treated as a full resident tax payer and you will need to state your worldwide assets in your Dutch tax return. It is important that you are well prepared for this change and seek tax advice.

“Take this example from an international from Greece who’s 30% ruling period will end January 1st 2021. From then on she will no longer be able to opt for non domestic taxpayer; that means she becomes taxable in the Netherlands for her worldwide assets. Since she has savings in Greece she will have to pay box-3 tax in the Netherlands. Our tax consultants can help her structure things in such a way to reduce her tax liability. One of the possibilities we would be looking at is to reduce her box 3 tax liability by using her savings to repay part of her Dutch morgage. Although in that case she would receive less mortgage relief it would als lead to reduction of payable mortgage interest. And she would have less savings and thus as a reduction in box 3 taxation.”

Tax on assets and foreign real estate

This year the threshold per individual is € 30,846 before the asset tax starts. Your assets of between €30,846 and € 103,643 are taxed at 0.54%; assets of between €103,643 and €1,036,418 will be taxed at 1.27%; and anything over that at 1.6%. Given these fixed amounts of tax are unrelated to the actual income your assets generate, the higher your income, the more tax efficient you are. But they are still amounts which have to be found and paid.

You also need to include foreign real estate in your tax return and request a deduction for double taxation. In most Dutch tax treaties, the taxation of real estate is always allocated to the country where the property is located.

Avoid a large fine

It is really important to be honest and fill in your tax form correctly. The Dutch tax office is particularly hot on foreign bank accounts, and you can be fined up to 300% of the unpaid tax if you forget to mention them.’

If you would like to find out more about maximising your tax efficiency and decreasing your risk of fines, please feel free to contact Suurmond Tax Consultants www.suurmond-taxconsultants.com .